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CULTURE & ARTS

The delights of reading!

Reading in print VS e-reading

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When nestled in a couch near a window, with a favourite book in one hand and an expresso in the other, there is a heavenly feeling that all book lovers can connect themselves with. And there is a likelihood that this moment is amongst their best minutes ever. But does it feel the same with words blinking on a screen?

With the coming of the advanced world, the notion of reading has greatly changed. There have been various discussions with respect to print reading and digital reading, and it has not been distinguished as yet since both have plenty of reasons to motivate their roles.

The traditional reading, that is, reading from the print, takes the crown for readers of the old school of thought, for a number of reasons. The first relates to the physical feature. Holding a book, turning the crispy pages, inhaling the smell of the book and actually seeing the reading progress with pages remaining less to the right-side are all possible with a printed book only. And for some this smell is no less than an intoxication, as American author Ray Bradbury has appropriately expressed in one of his axioms:

“A computer does not smell … if a book is new, it smells great. If a book is old, it smells even better… And it stays with you forever. But the computer doesn’t do that for you. I’m sorry.”

Secondly, reading isn’t merely a recreation moment if you ask a book freak. It’s an addiction, that involves cautiously crafted steps. The giddy feeling of stepping into a bookshop, sensing the musty scent of paper, running hands over the beautifully decorated bookshelves, glancing at the titles and carrying books back into your room to add to your collection, is a happiness that a bookworm looks forward to constantly. E-reading, on the other hand, would leave one deprived of this ecstasy.

‘Books are a great companion’, isn’t just a phrase. One is never alone if he or she has a book in hand. One can turn a page and immerse oneself into a tirade of emotions, adventures and perspectives. That’s how books have the power to keep the reader hostage for hours. Reading digital, on the other hand, is an alienated experience. Tell me if a screen can be hugged tightly after a good read with the feeling as intense as that of a paper book.

The list doesn’t end here, printed books have been considered to be friendly on eyes and give a genuine feeling of serenity. Digital reading only adds strains to the already drained mind with burning eyes. It has also been proved that looking at a gleaming screen before bed takes away sleep. If one reads for the sake of relaxation, digital reading surely doesn’t serve that purpose.

There is yet another custom in the worlds of bookworms. There is no doubt that books make the perfect present, and easily affordable to be more specific. So the next time readers are hit with an unplanned invitation, they don’t doubt to snag one good book from the nearest store. You can’t say this about e-book, however.

A more fascinating reason to champion paper books is the retention capability that scores high with printed books. As reported by The Guardian, a study by lead researcher Anne Mangen of Norway’s Stavanger University found that stories read on e-readers were not remembered as well as when they were read on a more traditional medium. In the same way, print reading is a more in-depth experience. Ziming Liu of San Jose State University conducted a study in the year 2005 where he found out that when people read using screens they spent more time scanning and jumping around to look for keywords and get as much information as they could in the least amount of time. This provided the evidence which proved that reading on screens was a less immersive experience as compared to reading print.

On the contrary, there are many reasons that have made digital reading a reality today. The most agreed reason would be that of accessibility. One can open up an e-book anywhere at any time, be it delay of a flight or waiting for friends in a restaurant. Unlike paper book, it doesn’t have to be carried along. Likewise, it spares readers from deciding which book to take on a trip. One can take a library long with no weight at all. Similarly, there comes a time when your favourite book isn’t available in stores. E-book can save you from that agony as you can download one in literally seconds. This point holds water for a country like Pakistan where about 97 percent of the population doesn’t have access to library.

In addition, digital reading is cost effective. Paper books are pricey, given the cost of publishing and distribution. E-books are affordable in comparison and can be obtained free of cost from various online platforms.

We cannot also ignore the fact that digital reading is eco-accommodating. Reading online saves the environment of the cost of papers that are overwhelmingly used to print books. According to statistics, global consumption of paper has grown 400 percent in the last 40 years. Now nearly 4 billion trees or 35 percent of the total trees cut around the world are used in paper industries on every continent. That equates to about 2.47 million trees cut down every day. With global warming soaring and our planet at the brink of destruction, digital reading provides an applauding option.

Undeniably, reading now has become more interesting and with different platforms like Good Reads, readers can connect to a network, where they can discuss their favourite books and authors. There are apps that can help one keep track of the number of books one reads. These consequently add some flavour to the reading experience.

During a time when technology is inescapable, adhering purely to print would be naive. A balance between both could be the right option. Nonetheless, both hardcore and digital books have noticeable dominance in the realm of reading. What matters most is a reader’s preference. Whether you like the convenience that comes with digital reading or are obsessed with printed book, never give up the habit of reading because it’s one of the few things that make this world beautiful.

Farzana Jahan Qarabash is a graduate of University of London. She is a developement professional and social work enthusiast with a love for writing.

CULTURE & ARTS

The Mystery Colour Pink Beholds

Colour stereotype is creation of our own societal values

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Pink has long been associated with girls, so where does this association come from?

Everything for a girl is pink, or will have at least a hint of pink. Starting from her nursery, toys, dresses to lunch box, school bag, pink is bombarded on girls.

There are a number of ways through which colours are imposed upon children. It begins when the baby is not even born. The phenomenal advancement in technology and prenatal testing, now makes it possible for parents to find out the sex of their still-not-born babies. This allows parents to decorate the nurseries in colours that they think are best suited with their newborn’s gender. It is the first step towards colour imposition.

It won’t be wrong to say that a baby girl is born in a pink world. It is this colour that she would find all around her after she opens her eyes for the first time. The room shading, dresses that she wears, toys she plays with and even birthday cakes she gets, are all pink. It’s not the parents only, this colour specification has become so real that new born gifts also comply with it. Visit a store for newborn accessories and the first question that is asked is about the gender of the baby. Even story books and children’s cartoons do their best to teach individuals gender specific behaviour . Barbie, Hello Kitty, My Little Pony n Friend are all girls’ favourite cartoons, painted in pink. Even the adventurous Dora wears a pink tee. Watching them, young girls associate themselves with the colour.

Marketing strategies that brands use further establish the colour identification for gender. It’s a psychological factor that brands exploit to leap their sales. They strictly follow with ‘pink for girls and blue for boys’ rule and make sure their customers comply.

Studies show that after the age of two, children begin to understand gender specific roles and girls choose pink over other colours to identify theirs. Professor of Gender and Culture at the UK’s Leeds University, Ruth Holliday, states that “Even very young girls understand that pink things are for them. In experiments where guns were painted pink and My Little Ponies were painted black and made to look spiky, three-year-old children assumed the gun was a girls’ toy and the pony a boys’ one. The colour rather than the function determined gender appeal.”

Colour preference isn’t biological, it’s more of a human made marvel. Girls and boys are both born with the similar arrangement of biological composition, the only difference being X & Y chromosomes. It’s not that girls have a pink chromosome or a pink strand of DNA that compels them to like pink more. And if we look at historical perspective, the findings are interesting.

History suggests that before the 1900s, babies were usually dressed in white regardless of gender. There were no differentiation amongst them on the basis of their colour preferences. If there was any, it was quite opposite from what it is today. An article in the 1918 issue of Ladies Home Journal reads that “the generally accepted rule is pink for boys and blue for girls; the reason is that pink being a decided and stronger colour is more suitable for boys, while blue which is more delicate and dainty, is prettier for the girls”. Then what brought the switch over?

Anya Helbert, a researcher at University of Newcastle, proposed that women prefer hues of red more because traditionally they have been more exposed to the colour by gathering fruits. Other studies regarding this topic cite some events that gave rise to the present colour enforcement. One such event is World War II, where due to the blue coloured uniform worn by soldiers, blue colour became associated with masculinity.

Similarly, in the 1940s, Think Movement tried to convince girls to embrace their feminism. This movement urged women to embrace their womanhood, with the name tag with pink, the colour naturally corresponding to women.

This colour coding creates a stereotype that stays entrenched in the minds of children even after they grow. They identify themselves with specific colour that not only limits their freedom but also bounds them to act in the ways society tells them to. This kills their imagination and creativity and limits their choices. One of the disastrous implications of this colour stereotyping is that it affects self-esteem. The very basic attributes of pink colour are that it’s pretty, polite, catchy and sensitive. When a girl is told throughout her lifetime that she has to be the manifestation of this colour to look more ‘girl like’, she tries to incorporate these attributes into her personality. The same is for boys, the tormenting and bullying that accompanies wearing pink is staggering to the point that boys, mostly avoid the colour even if they like it.

Angela Weyers, Style and Colour consultant comments that, pink is assumed as a sign of “weakness and a lack of intellectual rigour” and advises women to actually not wear it to work in the corporate world, as they are less likely to be taken seriously. This, along with other stigmas surrounding the color, make it a cliché.

Now when we have understood that colour stereotype is creation of our own societal values, we have to understand this as a societal issue. There is no such thing as real-man or real-woman. And pink has literally nothing to do with a woman. Both men and women are humans with no supernatural specifications and they should be treated that way. Parents, educational institutes and media can play their role in this regard. Rather than fabricating pink and blue norms they need to be responsible in raising individuals. Let pink and blue be treated as colours only.

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CULTURE & ARTS

Stop airing dramas with ‘indecent content’, watchdog warns TV channels

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PEMRA has warned channels against showing indecent content in dramas. File Photo

After receiving complaints from viewers, the Pakistan Electronic Media Regulatory Authority (PEMRA) has directed all channels not to air television dramas containing ‘indecent content’.

“Such content is not only distressing for viewers but is also against the commonly accepted standards of decency,” the media regulatory body stated in a notification.

The notification further adds that Pemra has been receiving massive public complaints on Pakistan Citizen Portal (PCP), PEMRA Complaints Call Center and Feedback System as well as through social media and Whatsapp.

The directive comes after viewers slammed content shown in dramas which are depicting indecent scenes, extramarital relations, violence, inappropriate dressing, rape scenes, use of drugs and alcohol and physical intimacy.

In order to be safe from any violation, all television channels are required to stop airing such content in dramas and produce content in consonance with the socio-cultural norms as per aspirations of our society.

The TV channels are advised to ensure compliance of provisions laid down in Pemra laws and the Electronic Media Code of Conduct 2015.

Earlier, PEMRA had announced it will suspend the licences of media outlets airing Indian content without issuing prior notice.

The media regulator has granted the authority to its chairman to revoke or suspend the licenses of companies airing Indian content without any prior notice.

The announcement came only a day after the top electronic media regulator requested the federal government to bring the level of Indian content on Pakistani channels at par with Pakistani media in the hostile South Asian neighbour’s broadcasts.

Previously, Pakistani channels were allowed to air six percent content during 24-hour transmission cycle. Until the decision by the government, PEMRA said, television channels and FM radio stations and cable operators were advised to strictly follow the current policy in this regard.

PEMRA recommended that permission to air Indian content in Pakistan should be linked with the Indian government’s decision to allow Pakistani content on Indian channels. Pakistan is taking this decision in the backdrop of recent hateful acts committed by India against Pakistani artists, where they were threatened, harassed and unceremoniously asked to leave the country.

 

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